Author Archive for lawrence baxter

Lawrence Baxter is a professor of the practice of law at Duke University in Durham, NC.  In his varied career Lawrence has taught law in the United States, South Africa, Australia, Belgium and Hong Kong, consulted for agencies of the federal government and worked on the staff of the United States Senate Committee on Banking, Housing and Urban Affairs during the period of reform after the Savings & Loan Crisis of the late 1980s, and has gained extensive experience in the business of financial services and e-commerce as a corporate executive vice president with one of the largest financial companies in the US.  He was educated in law and business at the University of Cambridge, England, and University of Natal (now KwaZulu-Natal) in South Africa.  Lawrence currently teaches, researches and writes in the fields of domestic and international banking regulation and its reform, regulatory reform and the ethics of financial business. Lawrence is married to a pediatrician and has three daughters and a son.

nailing naked nonsense

Teaching and research distractions have again kept me from blogging for a while.  I guess my defense is that learning the facts is always an important precursor to writing about them. This morning, however, I decided to divert from class…

so why is no one in jail?

In the aftermath of the Savings & Loan (S&L) crisis of the 1980s, there were over 1800 criminal prosecutions and more than a thousand financial executives went to prison.  So far the financiers who have met a similar fate in the…

pareto redux

To anyone who has noticed that theParetoCommons has been dormant during the past six months I owe an explanation for the hiatus and my thanks for bothering to read this post after so much time. (Indeed, were it not for…

the widening financial gyre

TURNING and turning in the widening gyre The falcon cannot hear the falconer; Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold; Mere anarchy is loosed upon the world, The blood-dimmed tide is loosed, (from William Butler Yeats’ The Second Coming (1919))…